Tag Archives: Poems for Two Voices

A Circus Poem for Two Voices!

13 May

I’ve always been fascinated by circuses, especially traditional ones from the late 1800’s that traveled by circus train from city to city, bringing along tents, animals, and performers. Maybe it was my obsession with Dumbo growing up (I loved anything Disney!), or the recent novels I’ve read, but I’ve been intrigued and wanting to learn more!

After recently reading Water for Elephants and The Night Circus (great books to add to your summer reading list!), I was inspired to create a circus-themed partner poem. I hoped to capture the magic of the Big Top. I love the booming voice of the ringmaster and the many different acts going on simultaneously in the different rings. As I was writing this poem, I was constantly digging into my childhood memories of going to a Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus. The experience was overwhelming yet fascinating at the same time!

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I must say, I had a hard time choosing circus characters. Do I focus on an animal’s perspective (probably sad) or a clowns (too creepy)? I absolutely love elephants, but when researching circus elephants and circus “lingo,” I stumbled upon one too many “Save the Elephants” articles that put me in a dark place. Poor elephants! 😦 Even though Ringling Bros. is phasing out elephants from their acts (see this article), it’s still sad; so, I scratched my original “Ringmaster vs. Elephant” poem for one that focused on the voices of a ringmaster and an acrobat.

The “poem for two voices” is filled with sensory adjectives and ringmaster hyperboles – perfect for a unit on figurative language! Another big focus of “The Circus is in Town” poem is character perspective and audience. In the poem, the ringmaster is talking to the gathering crowd and the acrobat’s voice is more internal.

This poem is part of my Everyday Partner Poetry series. Similar to the other packets, comprehension graphic organizers and CCSS response questions are included. Check it out!

TheCircusIsInTown_Collage

For last month’s Poetry Hop, I shared props for my “Wake Up, Grizzly Bear!” poem (you can still grab them!). I think I’ll eventually create and share props for all my partner poems, but here are the FREE poetry props for “The Circus is in Town,” in the mean time!

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Check out the additional partner poetry products in my store. There are currently 17 poems in the series (all included in the Mega Bundle!). More coming soon!

If you’re interested in helping to develop your students’ schema on circus life and vocabulary, here are a few great picture books:

Do you know of any picture books I can add to my list? Please comment below. I’d love to add new books my library!

Happy Teaching!

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Spring is Here — Poetry Hop

10 Apr

Poetry fun header

Welcome to the “Spring is Here!” Poetry Blog Hop. You’ve reached Stop # 13!

With the first few weeks of April behind us, you’re probably knee-deep in poetry and ready for some new resources for Poetry Month. Well, guess what?! I’ve teamed up with some of my favorite literacy bloggers to bring you a blog hop filled with FABULOUS poetry freebies. (Thank you to Carla, from Comprehension Connection, for organizing this hop!)

If you’re just joining us… WELCOME! However, you may want to hop back to Stop #1 (Comprehension Connection) to grab all the freebies you missed. If you want to keep going, though, you can always hop back at the end.

Poems for Two Voices

When I first started with partner poetry, I mostly used Partner Poems for Building Fluency by Tim Rasinski**. I still use a lot of those poems but have since developed my own poems with a back-and-forth narrative structure. Most of my poems have a sequence of events that the students can retell, and they’re more similar to a Readers Theater with assigned character parts. I liked the idea of two characters talking or thinking aloud in a dialogue-type structure. Many of the partner poems I’ve created have a problem/solution format, but others are just looking at ONE situation from two different points of view. (Check them out here!)

Typically, I integrate these poems around the holidays as literacy centers or for fluency warm-ups, but I’ve started to use them more for other integrated literacy skills, as well. They’re great for character analysis, making inferences, making connections, analyzing point of view, and so much more!

For my poetry blog hop freebie, I decided to share my NEWEST partner poem (with comprehension activities), “Wake Up, Grizzly Bear!” This product will be free, for a LIMITED TIME only, during the blog hop (4/10/15-4/12/15). It will go back to being a paid item in my store on April 13, 2015.

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I’ve also included a few props to use with this poem. (Aren’t the graphics from Teaching in the Tongass so cute?!) All you have to do is download/print the file from Google Docs, cut out the characters, and laminate or glue to paper plates. These props could be fun for your April Poetry Month performances!

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More Resources

Looking for more ideas? Here are additional poems and poetry books for multiple voices that I currently use in my classroom:

MsJordanReads Giveaway

For those of you who follow my store, you know that I recently bundled ALL my partner poetry products into one GIANT mega-bundle. I’ll be giving away this bundle to ONE lucky winner on this hop! (Will it be you?!)

Check out the product by clicking the image below:

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Thank you to everyone who entered my giveaway for a chance to win! This giveaway has officially ended.

The winner is…

Markisha Herring

Thanks for joining the hop and stopping by!

Head on over to Book Units Teacher for the next stop:

Poetry hop.next stop

Happy Hopping!

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**This post contains affiliate links. Click HERE to learn what that means!
Spring is Here Poetry Hop Graphics are from:

Exploring Perspective and Point of View

29 Mar

Happy Spring!

Here in WNY we’ve had a “tease” of spring, but so far the remaining days of March have been pretty cold (and even a little snowy – *yikes*). At this point, I’m 100% over the cold weather and ready for some warmer temperatures. Before we head into April, and my focus turns to poetry (Yay, Poetry Month!), I wanted to share a few of the fun activities I’ve been doing with my students.

Be prepared for a few extra posts this week! 🙂

As some of you know, I love my small RTI pull-out groups, but I also enjoy the dynamic of an entire classroom of students. This year, with a combination push-in/pull-out program, I’ve been able to do both.

For part of my day, I have the pleasure of working with a third grade teacher who is just FABULOUS (You rock, Jan!). She has great ideas and is always willing to try new things. A few of my RTI students are in her classroom, so I work with them during small group time and provide extra support for them during whole group mini-lessons and activities.

Last week, we explored perspective and point of view with our students. To kick off the week, we read I Am the Dog I Am the Cat – a great book for introducing perspectives. It’s a book with two voices and two characters, so the students can compare and contrast different perspectives within the same text. Since many students have pets, this is also a great book for them to relate to and make text-to-self connections.

On Tuesday, we spent time with one of my new favorite books, The Day the Crayons Quit. (Seriously, this book is the BEST for point of view, and it’s absolutely hysterical! If you’ve never read it, you need to… right now. Your students will love it, too!)

We read this book as a read-aloud, and then the students worked independently to further explore each crayon’s letter and unique point of view. I retyped the letters, and we put a basket of letters on each table. Students pulled out one letter at a time and recorded the character point of view on the graphic organizer.

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The finished products were wonderful, and it was a great way for students to practice analyzing character point of view.

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 (Download the graphic organizer we used for FREE by clicking the image below!)

TheDaytheCrayonsQuit_GraphicOrganizer

As an added bonus, some of the perspectives weren’t stated explicitly, so this allowed students to practice making inferences using text evidence. (I always love when we can embed and review past skills and strategies, don’t you?!) It was also a great way to bring in some problem-solving skills. We stopped before the last few pages and asked the students to brainstorm how the main character should solve the problem. We asked them what they would do if they were Duncan. The students did such a nice job with this, and some of their solutions were truly creative!

(UPDATE: There is a sequel that is JUST as perfect for point of view. The Days the Crayons Came Home. Check it out HERE! Now you can use one text for modeling and one for independent/small group practice.)

Throughout the week, we worked in small groups to further practice analyzing the point of view with instructional level texts. We used a combination of books, text passages, and poetry – including a few of my Partner Perspective Poems!

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Check out the links below for a few of these partner poems:

(NOTE: In addition to my everyday poems that are perfect for teaching point of view, there are many seasonal partner poems in my store, as well. Stay tuned — I’m working on a new springtime poem for April’s Poetry month, too! It will sold individually and will be added to the Spring Bundle and MEGA Bundle.

Additional Point of View Mentor Texts & Picture Books:

FRACTURED FAIRY TALES

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs

The Wolf’s Story

The Pea and the Princess

Honestly, Red Riding Hood Was Rotten!

OTHER PICTURE BOOKS

Two Bad Ants

The Pain and the Great One

Hey, Little Ant

Dear Mrs. LaRue: Letters from Obedience School

What resources do YOU use to teach point of view? I’d love to hear your ideas and add to my growing list of mentor texts for teaching point of view. Email me msjordanreads@gmail.com or comment below. 🙂

Happy Teaching!

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**This post contains affiliate links. Click HERE to learn what that means!
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