Tag Archives: MsJordanReads Poetry

A Circus Poem for Two Voices!

13 May

I’ve always been fascinated by circuses, especially traditional ones from the late 1800’s that traveled by circus train from city to city, bringing along tents, animals, and performers. Maybe it was my obsession with Dumbo growing up (I loved anything Disney!), or the recent novels I’ve read, but I’ve been intrigued and wanting to learn more!

After recently reading Water for Elephants and The Night Circus (great books to add to your summer reading list!), I was inspired to create a circus-themed partner poem. I hoped to capture the magic of the Big Top. I love the booming voice of the ringmaster and the many different acts going on simultaneously in the different rings. As I was writing this poem, I was constantly digging into my childhood memories of going to a Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus. The experience was overwhelming yet fascinating at the same time!

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I must say, I had a hard time choosing circus characters. Do I focus on an animal’s perspective (probably sad) or a clowns (too creepy)? I absolutely love elephants, but when researching circus elephants and circus “lingo,” I stumbled upon one too many “Save the Elephants” articles that put me in a dark place. Poor elephants! 😦 Even though Ringling Bros. is phasing out elephants from their acts (see this article), it’s still sad; so, I scratched my original “Ringmaster vs. Elephant” poem for one that focused on the voices of a ringmaster and an acrobat.

The “poem for two voices” is filled with sensory adjectives and ringmaster hyperboles – perfect for a unit on figurative language! Another big focus of “The Circus is in Town” poem is character perspective and audience. In the poem, the ringmaster is talking to the gathering crowd and the acrobat’s voice is more internal.

This poem is part of my Everyday Partner Poetry series. Similar to the other packets, comprehension graphic organizers and CCSS response questions are included. Check it out!

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For last month’s Poetry Hop, I shared props for my “Wake Up, Grizzly Bear!” poem (you can still grab them!). I think I’ll eventually create and share props for all my partner poems, but here are the FREE poetry props for “The Circus is in Town,” in the mean time!

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Check out the additional partner poetry products in my store. There are currently 17 poems in the series (all included in the Mega Bundle!). More coming soon!

If you’re interested in helping to develop your students’ schema on circus life and vocabulary, here are a few great picture books:

Do you know of any picture books I can add to my list? Please comment below. I’d love to add new books my library!

Happy Teaching!

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Spring is Here — Poetry Hop

10 Apr

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Welcome to the “Spring is Here!” Poetry Blog Hop. You’ve reached Stop # 13!

With the first few weeks of April behind us, you’re probably knee-deep in poetry and ready for some new resources for Poetry Month. Well, guess what?! I’ve teamed up with some of my favorite literacy bloggers to bring you a blog hop filled with FABULOUS poetry freebies. (Thank you to Carla, from Comprehension Connection, for organizing this hop!)

If you’re just joining us… WELCOME! However, you may want to hop back to Stop #1 (Comprehension Connection) to grab all the freebies you missed. If you want to keep going, though, you can always hop back at the end.

Poems for Two Voices

When I first started with partner poetry, I mostly used Partner Poems for Building Fluency by Tim Rasinski**. I still use a lot of those poems but have since developed my own poems with a back-and-forth narrative structure. Most of my poems have a sequence of events that the students can retell, and they’re more similar to a Readers Theater with assigned character parts. I liked the idea of two characters talking or thinking aloud in a dialogue-type structure. Many of the partner poems I’ve created have a problem/solution format, but others are just looking at ONE situation from two different points of view. (Check them out here!)

Typically, I integrate these poems around the holidays as literacy centers or for fluency warm-ups, but I’ve started to use them more for other integrated literacy skills, as well. They’re great for character analysis, making inferences, making connections, analyzing point of view, and so much more!

For my poetry blog hop freebie, I decided to share my NEWEST partner poem (with comprehension activities), “Wake Up, Grizzly Bear!” This product will be free, for a LIMITED TIME only, during the blog hop (4/10/15-4/12/15). It will go back to being a paid item in my store on April 13, 2015.

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I’ve also included a few props to use with this poem. (Aren’t the graphics from Teaching in the Tongass so cute?!) All you have to do is download/print the file from Google Docs, cut out the characters, and laminate or glue to paper plates. These props could be fun for your April Poetry Month performances!

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More Resources

Looking for more ideas? Here are additional poems and poetry books for multiple voices that I currently use in my classroom:

MsJordanReads Giveaway

For those of you who follow my store, you know that I recently bundled ALL my partner poetry products into one GIANT mega-bundle. I’ll be giving away this bundle to ONE lucky winner on this hop! (Will it be you?!)

Check out the product by clicking the image below:

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Thank you to everyone who entered my giveaway for a chance to win! This giveaway has officially ended.

The winner is…

Markisha Herring

Thanks for joining the hop and stopping by!

Head on over to Book Units Teacher for the next stop:

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Happy Hopping!

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**This post contains affiliate links. Click HERE to learn what that means!
Spring is Here Poetry Hop Graphics are from:

A Lil Bit O’ St. Patrick’s Day Fun!

17 Mar

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Each year, I try to bring a little bit of St. Patrick’s Day fun into my RTI program, and my goal is to incorporate holiday-themed activities with interventions that are already in place. This week, I planned a variety of poetry, language, and phonics activities appropriate for each of my groups. Here’s a quick snapshot of a few of our activities! 🙂

A Lil Bit O’ Figurative Language

My fifth graders have been focusing on figurative language and analyzing poetry. I’ve been trying break down the different figurative language elements and terms throughout the week, while providing them with a variety of practice opportunities. Today, as a warm up, I had my group complete a fun practice St. Patrick’s Day writing task on the iPads (Read more about how to “go paperless” here!). Students had to brainstorm sentences for each of the different examples of figurative language. You can grab this for FREE below!

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Download HERE or by clicking the image above!

A Lil Bit O’ Word Work

This page is part of my Daily Phonics program. I don’t use Daily Phonics with all of my decoding students, but today my second grade groups worked through a page together! This is always a great assessment for me, to see where their phonics skills are. (NOTE: Most of my students completed these on the iPads, but for the classrooms I push-into I had paper copies for them to complete. Daily Phonics is a great paperless warm-up for students!)

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A Lot Bit O’ Poetry

I love, love, LOVE using poetry to celebrate the holidays! So many of my students need fluency practice, so poetry is a wonderful intervention for reinforcing these skills.

Here are a few of my own that I used this week:

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How did you celebrate St. Patrick’s Day?

I would love to hear about St. Patrick’s Day interventions and activities you used with your students today! Please share in the comments below!

Happy Teaching! 

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Pumpkin Visualizing!

18 Oct

With the fall season upon us, I thought it would be the perfect time to bring more PUMPKINS into my teaching! ‘Tis the season, right? 🙂

Last week, I reviewed visualizing with one of my 3rd grade RtI groups. We talked about the purpose of descriptive words and spent some time reviewing adjectives.

To reinforce descriptive language, we went on an adjective word hunt using various pumpkin poetry. I love using Virginia Kroll’s “Pumpkins” poem (you can find this poem in Read and Understand Poetry, Grades 2-3). It has a fun rhythm, and it really hooks my reluctant readers. Plus, it has over a dozen adjectives crammed into the poem! If you don’t have this resource, you can use any poem about pumpkins that includes adjectives.

MsJordanReads Poems About Pumpkins:

Other Poems About Pumpkins:

The students highlighted the adjectives in the poem, and we recorded our adjectives on an anchor chart.

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My students then helped me brainstorm additional adjectives for the different categories. We made our own roll-a-pumpkin chart and the students had fun rolling dice for adjectives and visualizing pumpkins using the adjectives they rolled.

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They recorded their first round of Roll-a-Pumpkin adjectives in their writing notebooks and sketched using a pencil.

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This was a great activity for students to practice visualizing because they had to incorporate ALL the adjectives they rolled and had to make their pumpkins come to life! We made final copies of our illustrated pumpkins with an adjective sentence to display in the hallway.

Interested in trying out this activity?

Create your own roll-a-pumpkin charts with your students, or grab the ready-to-use Roll-a-Pumpkin! activity packet I uploaded to TpT. All you have to do is print and provide a dice! There are two different chart & recording options (3 adjectives or 5 adjectives).

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Happy Teaching! 

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**This post contains affiliate links. Click HERE to learn what that means!

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